Visualizing the news: on storytelling

Matthew Ericson of the New York Times (and former co-worker of mine) put together slides of his recent presentation at AIGA Pivot. The presentation must have rocked because the slide deck, while short on details, is rich in thought provoking: PDF. For a recent example from his team, check out today’s interactive on the Euro […]

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Recent Space-X on NPR highlights how little we read

A story is posted about a private company working to build the largest capacity lifter in service and what do a significant number of commentors fret about? That the government is wasting its money on building it! It is pretty clear that most of those who are commenting that way have not read (or worst […]

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How poor information design led to Waterfall

I just took part in a great 3 day training session with Uncle Bob Martin on TDD and healthy software design. One of the tidbits Bob shared was the history behind the Waterfall methodology that some of us older folks strained against until agile and lean methodologies started to get well known. Waterfall originated in […]

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Hyper-local is about community or it fails

There have been numerous efforts at building services focused on local communities, and almost all of them, that have not had a community element to them, have failed to one degree or another. Just being an aggregator is not enough. You need to curate. Moderate. Collate. Summarize. Connect. Most of all – communicate! Sure software […]

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Counting political party stories on Google News

I am *not* accusing anyone of coverage bias. I’d bet that Google News’s story inclusion algorithms probably reflect what people are linking to and discussing generally. Google News: “Republican Party”: 11,579 stories Google News: “Tea Party”: 22,977 stories Google News: “Democratic Party”: 15,668 stories Fascinating.

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