Life Lessons from Programming: Check your assumptions

Jon Udell wrote a short piece that resonated with me on taking a principle from software engineering and applying it to discourse and relationships: “Check your assumptions”. He takes the idea that when debugging, you should: Focus on understanding why the program is doing what it’s doing, rather than why it’s not doing what you […]

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Favorite Reads for 2012

Following is a list of books, essays, and articles I read (or re-read) which feel worth sharing or re-sharing on on New Years Eve: Books “Thinking in Systems: A Primer”, by Donella H. Meadows “Release It!”, by Michael T. Nygard “Language in Thought and Action”, by S.I. Hayakawa, Alan R. Hayakawa, and Robert MacNeil “The […]

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“Mysterious Algorithm Was 4% of Trading Activity Last Week”

According to CNBC an unknown program triggered 4% of trading activity last week: The program placed orders in 25-millisecond bursts involving about 500 stocks, according to Nanex, a market data firm. The algorithm never executed a single trade, and it abruptly ended at about 10:30 a.m. Friday. Someone testing in production perhaps?

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“Say what you mean. Bear witness. Iterate.”

I went on an interesting journey online last night that led me to the source of the above phrase, a poem on mortality, entropy, memory… and databases. Yes, you read that right. I read Tor.com’s wonderful blog almost once a day to check up posts on books, favorite sci-fi and fantasy TV Series, and more. […]

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Steve Klabnik: Nobody Understands REST or HTTP

Steve Klabnik outlines some best practices in API design in “Nobody Understands REST or HTTP”, some of which I admit I need to follow more consistently. As he states in the end: Seriously, most of the problems that you’re solving are social, not technical. The web is decades old at this point, most people have […]

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