Internet life links for October 31, 2009

Alex Hillman recently tweeted: “Twitter lists illustrate the most important shift in the internet: your bio is now written by others, and what they say about you.” He follows up with a longer piece on his blog. Google Wave: we came, we saw, we played D&D: It’s easy to see why many people who use […]

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Blogging is dead (no its not)

Seth Finkelstein posts “Why (individual) Blogging Is Dead – Objective Measurement” – but his own thread proves otherwise if you ask me. It comes down to who you want to hear you. For me, its friends (online and off), family, co-workers, and those that might seek me out (or my opinions) for some reason or […]

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Challenging conventional wisdom about the direction of media

New Yorker: Malcolm Gladwell: Priced to Sell – a scathing review of Wired’s Chris Anderson’s new book “Free: The Future of a Radical Price” and the concepts promoted within. NYTimes: Keeping News of Kidnapping Off Wikipedia – the NYTimes coordinated with Wikipedia staff to keep a factual event from appearing on the service. Say Everything: […]

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A Blogging History Worth Reading?

I’m really looking forward to reading Scott Rosenberg’s “Say Everything”. I’m sure “Say Everything” will be a book I can share with others (which I do with “Dreaming in Code”) to provide them insight into why I do some of the things I do and why I get so damn passionate about them. Writing a […]

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Smart aggregation and API use in NPRbackstory

NPRbackstory is an automated Twitter feed that attempts to add context to the news stories trending popular today according to Google’s Hot Trends. It leverages NPR’s archives (very smart, as Joshua Benton notes archives are underused assets), and Yahoo! Pipes to produce a RSS feed that is fed into the NPRbackstory account. It was developed […]

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Refresh Philly Followups

Following Refresh Philly May have been some great discussions in its related Google Group. Technically Philly posted two followups: City CIO’s $100 million Digital Philadelphia vision and Editorial: City government calls for tech support Jonny Goldstein, on his blog, envizualize, had literally, visualized the discussion with some art live at the discussion that is just […]

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