Monthly Archives: September 2004

A Bed of Tragedies

The cause of death of the 5-month-old boy remains a mystery to his family.

But the tragedy shouldn’t be a surprise to some city officials.

Because 43 babies have died in our city in the last 17 months while sleeping with other people.

And, unfathomable as it sounds, at least two city agencies knew about the disturbing trend and failed to bring it to public attention.

Daily News: Jill Porter: 09-10-2004

It’s Worse Than You Think

cite="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5973272/site/newsweek/">

For U.S.
troops in Iraq, one especially sore point is the stateside public’s
obsession with the candidates’ decades-old military service. “Stop
talking about Vietnam,” says one U.S. official who has spent time in
the Sunni Triangle. “People should be debating this war, not that
one.” His point was not that America ought to walk away from Iraq.
Hardly any U.S. personnel would call that a sane suggestion. But
there’s widespread agreement that Washington needs to rethink its
objectives, and quickly. “We’re dealing with a population that hovers
between bare tolerance and outright hostility,” says a senior U.S.
diplomat in Baghdad. “This idea of a functioning democracy here is
crazy. We thought that there would be a reprieve after sovereignty,
but all hell is breaking loose.

href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5973272/site/newsweek/">MSNBC:
09-12-2004

Preventive War: A Failed Doctrine

If facts mattered in American politics, the Bush-Cheney ticket would not be basing its re-election campaign on the fear-mongering contention that the surest defense against future terrorist attacks lies in the badly discredited doctrine of preventive war. Vice President Dick Cheney took this argument to a disgraceful low last week when he implied that electing John Kerry and returning to traditional American foreign policy values would invite a devastating new strike.

So far, the preventive war doctrine has had one real test: the invasion of Iraq. Mr. Bush terrified millions of Americans into believing that forcibly changing the regime in Baghdad was the only way to keep Iraq’s supposed stockpiles of unconventional weapons out of the hands of Al Qaeda. Then it turned out that there were no stockpiles and no operational links between Saddam Hussein’s regime and Al Qaeda’s anti-American terrorism.

NYTimes: 09-12-2004

Ozzfest in Philly

…Judas Priest showed up and proceeded to wipe the floor with pretty much every other band on the bill. I’d seen Rob Halford before when he was touring for one of his solo albums, but seeing him with the rest of Judas Priest was truly an awesome experience. I don’t think there’s a member of the band that’s under the age of 50, but they play like a band half their age.
The band’s set list was limited to their greatest hits – no surprise renditions of “Island of Domination”� or “Bloodstone”� here. However, considering I never thought I’d actually see a Judas Priest reunion in my lifetime, I would have been happy if they’d played nothing but songs from Turbo. The band played “Electric Eye”, “Metal Gods”, “The Sentinel”, “Victim of Changes”, “Painkiller”, “A Touch of Evil”, “Breaking the Law”, “Heading out to the Highway”, “The Green Manalishi”, and “Beyond the Realms of Death”. The first heavy metal I ever bought was Judas Priest’s Unleashed in the East, and finally being able to see the band live was a dream come true. The band’s encore consisted of “Hell Bent for Leather”, which began with Rob Halford riding a motorcycle on stage, “Living after Midnight”, and “You’ve Got Another Thing Coming”. The band got the biggest crowd reaction of the night, and I do not exaggerate when I say that Judas Priest is the greatest musical group in human history. It was a religious experience.

Chris Puzak : 09-05-2004
Sounds like I missed an awesome show.