Let’s be honest – it was a great season right?

Hey, don’t get down folks. Who thought we could have made it this far earlier in the season? Last night the team beat itself. That’s what makes it so damn sad. One thing that gets me is how bad the press – everybody – called this game. No one predicted the outcome. Last year the […]

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Activism alive and kicking

WashingtonPost: 100,000 Expected To Protest Iraq War via Booknotes. Good. What will the story of the day be after the protests are over? Will any leaders with inspirational speaches and vision make themselves known? Looks like the protest movement is starting to go mainstream. In related news, Oliver Willis continues his call for a tougher […]

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Rediscovering the reason for participation

Denise Larrabee, for the Philadelphia Inquirer, writes: As a writer with two young children who works at home, I realize it’s far too easy for me to become isolated from the real world and its problems, which can seem overwhelming and complex by the end of my hectic day. Once a person is overwhelmed, apathy […]

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Where are the fathers?

In this Inquirer editorial Jane Eisner writes How state officials charged with protecting the lives of endangered children could lose track of Williams’ three boys – and, it turns out, 277 others – is mind-boggling. Gov. McGreevey’s pledge to address his government’s many failures in these cases can’t be realized a moment too soon. But […]

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A turnaround plan for Philly schools

Great interview with Paul Vallas, chief of the Philadelphia school system, posted at CSMonitor. “It’s not that the schools got bad,” argues Vallas. “It’s that things changed around them. We’re preparing children for the economy of the future in the schools of yesterday.” Politicians and education policy planners simply haven’t kept up, he says. “You’ve […]

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